Steamed Snapper with Veggies Delight

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You probably can’t see the fish buried underneath all the veggies pile but this is one of my favorite dish to make because it’s easy and I only have to make one dish to get a balance meal for my family of 2+1.

Not only it is simple, quick and enjoyable by even my little tot, you can also substitute with whatever white fish and veggies you like as long as you don’t overcook them and having to time when to add in the vegetables during the steaming process is important.

Ingredients:

6-7 ounces  of white fish fillet (Here I used red snapper)
One large heirloom tomatoes/ or two medium red tomatoes (half then sliced)
1 cup broccoli florets
1/2 cup broccoli stems sticks (remove the outer skin, then julienne)
1/2 tablespoon sliced ginger
One cup chopped cilantro
1/4 cup low sodium chicken stocks
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon white pepper powder

Instructions:

  • Place the fish fillet in the center of a round deep dish, add in ginger, sprinkle on top the salt, white pepper powder, and pour over the soy sauce and sesame oil.
  • Arrange the tomatoes slices on the side into a fan shape. Add in the chicken stocks
  • Add water to a steamer and bring to a boil, place the dish inside the steamer and steam about 15 minutes.
  • Arrange the broccoli sticks in the middle and broccoli florets on the side using chopstick to prevent being burn by the steam.  Steam for additional 5 minutes
  • Turn of the heat, and add in cilantro in the middle. Cover for another one minute.
  • Garnish with roasted garlic and garlic oil. (optional)

Raising Adventurous Young Eater

A lot of parent appears to be in a lot of constant struggle (including myself) with their children when it comes to eating.  Every day is different, they can be the best eater one day and the next is “NO, NO, NO” for all the foods they used to like before, leaving parent scratching their heads.

I believed that eating is a learned behavior and we can foster that sophisticated palate at a very young age.  What is young you ask?  The answer is infancy (Day 1) You can expose your infant to different flavor through your breast milk. How neat is that?!?!  Mother’s breast milk changes according to the types of food she’s eating. So, the more variety of foods you eat, the more complex taste your milk will be and the baby is less likely to reject new foods later on as they already are familiar with the flavor .

Well, formula mamas don’t get discouraged either, any duration of breastfeeding you can provide still shows good benefits and reduces their risk of becoming a picky eater when they reach pre-school age.  Remember: Any breastfeeding is better than nothing. You can still teach your young child to eat a variety of foods when they are starting complimentary foods (right about 6 months of age).

Here’s a few tips that can get you started:

DINING ATMOSPHERE

The eating environment for your child should be enjoyable.  No distraction of TV, video games, phone and tablet. All electronics to be turn off at meal time. Meal time should be around the same time everyday. Kids does well with routine and it does take about 6-7 weeks to build up a new habit. All family members needs to sit down at the table and eat together. Everyone needs to eat the same food (correct texture and consistency for the young infant), family style. Let the children pick and choose what they wanted, at least all food should be sampled.  No yelling, shouting or force feeding as we don’t want your kid to associate eating with bad experiences.

ROLE MODEL

Baby and toddler are smart, they observe adults behavior and emulate them. They also learn to manipulate the parent so they get what they wanted. So parent needs to be consistent (Both mom and dad) in relaying the same message for their kids when it comes to food and eating. If you are not an adventurous eating, please don’t expect that your child will eat everything you ask them to.  Be a role model for your children, eat and try new food in front of them.

IT TAKES MORE THAN ONE TRY

The key is “Try new food”, it takes repetition of 9-10 tries of introduction of the same food before the kid will accept/like them.  Just because they don’t like it in the beginning, doesn’t mean they wouldn’t try it again. Sometimes is the texture they don’t like, so be in tune with the types of foods your child enjoys.

HAVE FUN WHILE LEARNING

For young children less than 3 years old, let them play with the food.  It’s going to be messy but allowing the children to play with food will reduces their anxiety of eating them later on. Set them up on high chair or booster seat and teach them about the food, play (brush their teeth with it, splash, smash, tear) and then show them how you cook with it in food later on.

Take them to grocery stores and let them pick a new food (preferably fresh foods, not processed) from the isle and both of you can explore together what to make using it. Making food into fun shapes and sizes with cookie cutter would work too.

Educate your young child why the food is good for them, whether it be strong bones, good vision, become a super hero that they admires or becoming strong and tall like the athletes they wanted to become or grow tall enough to get to the rides in adventure parks.

DON’T SKIMP ON FLAVOR

Food doesn’t have to be bland. It can have some flavor.  Infant less than one year old is best to stay away from salt but you can include other herbs and spice (Not spicy) to amp up the flavor of foods. But, if your children prefers bland food, that’s ok too, as long as they are open in trying different foods.

 

NO SNACKING 1 1/2-2 HOURS BEFORE MEAL TIME

Children stomach capacity is small. If they snack too close to meal time, then they wouldn’t be hungry at meal time. Then you’ll be struggling to even get him/her to take a bite of food, but then later at bedtime they will be asking for cereal when they become hungry.  Occasionally that’s ok when you don’t want to deal with power struggle with your stubborn child (we are all human after all).  However, if it continuous, then the children will learn that it’s acceptable for him/her not to eat lunch/dinner because he/she will get to snacks all day and eat their favorite cereal at bedtime.

REWARD SYSTEM

Kids thrive on being praise and feeling proud of themselves. So, if they eat a new food, reward them with things they like to do, whether it be a chocolate/ice cream after meal or 20-30 minutes more play time with his/her favorite activities.

Bottom line:

  • Breastfeeding from Day 1.
  • Let the young kids explore with food, have fun while doing it.
  • Don’t make separate meals to cater to them. Eat together as a family.
  • Be persistent, consistent and patience.  Routine is your best friend !

 

Gestational Diabetes: What Should I do ?

“You have Gestational Diabetes.”  If you hear that statement when you are pregnant, don’t be frightened. Even though it’s not a desirable diagnosis we would like to hear while we are growing a baby, but there’s ways you can do to keep it under control without needing to take insulin.

Diabetes (high blood sugars) that is diagnosed during your pregnancy is called “Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM)”.  According to American Diabetes Association, the prevalence of GDM is as high as 9.2%.  Pregnancy naturally increases your insulin resistance due to the growth hormone releases from the placenta, therefore all expectant mothers are at risk for developing GDM and we all have to go through the gruesome glucose tolerance test around 26-28 weeks of our pregnancy to ensure we don’t develop it.

Gestational diabetes is not to be taken lightly. Uncontrolled blood sugar level will negatively affect your growing baby in vitro and also putting your newborn baby at risk for very low blood sugar at birth, increases their risk for obesity and developing Type 2 diabetes in adulthood.

So, what can you do? Best way to keep your blood sugar in check is to watch the amount of carbohydrate intake daily.  Therefore, knowing what kind of foods contains carbohydrate is the first step.

Carbohydrate Containing Foods:

  • Grains, Rice, Cereals, Pasta, Breads, Crackers, Tortillas, Anything made with flour
  • Starchy Vegetables: Potatoes, Yams, Corn, Peas, Squash (Winter, Pumpkin, Kabocha)
  • Dried beans, Legumes, Lentils
  • Fruits, Dried Fruits, Fruit Juices
  • Milk and Yogurt
  • Carbonated drink, desserts.

Basic Dietary Modification: 

Be mindful of Breakfast

When you have GDM, morning blood sugar is the hardest to predict and control due to the highest concentration of pregnancy hormone during the morning. Therefore, it is recommended to only have 2 carbohydrate choices or 30g of carbohydrate foods during breakfast time and eat a higher protein meal to keep hunger at bay.  In addition, it is advised to avoid fruits and fruit juices in the morning as the simple fruit sugars are easily digested, which in turn raises the blood sugar too quickly.

Eat 3 meals and 2 snacks

One way to keeping blood sugar stable is to avoid the peaks and fall. Having a smaller but frequent meal to provide the body steady supply of glucose to be utilized and distributed to your growing baby. Make sure you include about 15-20 g of complex carbohydrate at snack time.

Pair your carbohydrate with protein

Eating carbohydrate with a protein food will help stabilize your blood glucose level.  The body needs time to digest the food mixture, therefore avoiding the highs and lows when compared to just eating a heavy carbohydrate meal alone.

Eat Complex Carbohydrate

Even though carbohydrate appears to be the bad guy here, but our body still need carbohydrate to function on a daily basis.  So, how can we achieve a balance? Eat complex carbohydrate foods (whole grains, brown rice, legumes, beans, vegetables (both starchy and non-starchy).Try to keep your carbohydrate amount at lunch and dinner in between 60-75 g per meal.

Space you Milk/Milk alternative consumption

Milk/Milk alternative is a healthy beverage and good source of calcium and vitamin D. However, it is a liquid carbohydrate just as similar to juice; it gets absorb very quickly and can raise the blood sugar rather fast. So, it is best to just drink one cup of milk at a time.

Limit Concentrated Sugar:

The moment you are told no sugar allows are the times you crave them the most. Daily intake of cakes, cookies, ice creams, candies and pastries can raises your blood sugar too high that you will require insulin injection to keep it under control. While sweets are hard to resist, but remember, they offer high amount of fats and little nutrition values to you and your baby. Occasional treat once in a while is totally acceptable.

If you can’t curb your sweet tooth. The sugar free products are usually safe in moderation. Here’s a list of sugar substitute that is considered safe during pregnancy:

  • Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet, Natra Taste)
  • Acesulfame K (Sunett)
  • Sucralose (Splenda)
  • Rebaudioside A (Stevia)

There’s sugar substitute that is not safe which is saccharin (Sweet N’ Low) and cyclamate (Sugar Twin). So, make sure you read the ingredient list.

Don’t try to cut out all the carbohydrates in your diet, which I’ve heard a lot of my patients told me that’s what their doctor instruct them to do (most of the time is a misunderstanding or miscommunication of info”.  Find a local Registered Dietitian in your area, she/he can help with personalized your diet and help you eat a balance diet for pregnancy and keeping the blood sugar in control.

Bottom Line:

  1. Keep carbohydrate consistent at meal time (30g at Breakfast, 60-75g at Lunch/Dinner).
  2. Avoid fruit/fruit juice/yogurt in the morning.
  3.  Limit concentrated sweets and added sugar in foods.
  4. Eat smaller but frequent meals.